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A Time and a Place for your Story...
There is a tendency among critics to find fault with writers who follow a trend, or try to make their work more saleable by linking it to events in the past. The obvious example this year is the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War and the positive flood of articles and books appearing now. I don’t have a problem with linking one’s work to a happening in the past. It can be extremely effective, provided that...
Do I Need An Editor For My Self Published Book?...
This is one of those questions with several answers; a trick question if you like. The nearest I can get is, ‘probably.’ I have edited more than fifty self-published books, fiction and non fiction and in every case I had no doubt that I was needed and that it would pay my client to pay me! I have been following a discussion on line, which is sure to bewilder anyone looking for information. Yes, there was good advice, but...
To Edit or Not to Edit?
Recently I triggered a seemingly unstoppable discussion on LinkedIn by asking writers if they would pay for editorial services and, if so, how much they would pay. Writers and editors weighed in with both yea and nay responses, various analyses of pricing, and the chasms into which writers fall when hiring an editor. Opinions ranged from one extreme to the other: either writers who fail to work with professional editors are doomed, or writers don’t need editors if they...
Use Industry Standard Non-Fiction Book Elements...
As a self publisher, you need to meet industry standards in order to get your book recognized. Thousands of books are published every day. This means you have lots of competition. If your book appears to be sub-standard, missing elements that are required by the publishing industry, you won’t get very far in publishing. I have seen the forums for self publishers where some authors argue that these elements are not really required. If you have read that somewhere,...
Why I Don’t Like Vanity Presses...
Over the years, vanity presses have gotten a pretty bad reputation for duping people into printing a whole lot of books that won’t sell. (Ironically, one of the biggest reasons that the books won’t sell is that they were published by a vanity press.)  Since the term vanity press has become synonymous in some circles with “ripoff,” many have taken to calling themselves subsidy presses instead. Whether you call them vanity presses or subsidy presses, they are the same...
Publishing Choices For Authors...
An aspiring author wanting to see his or her books in print has a more options today than just a few years ago. E-BOOKS A very popular option is to publish your book as an e-book. E-books come in several formats. I’m sure you have seen people who are hawking their how-to books online and offering them for some pretty high prices such as $79.99, or even $139.99 for a downloadable PDF of their book. Of course, they claimed...
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Publishing Choices For Authors...

An aspiring author wanting to see his or her books in print has a more options today than just a few years ago. E-BOOKS A very popular option is to publish your book as an e-book. E-books come in several formats. I’m sure you have seen people who are hawking their how-to books online and offering them for some pretty high prices such as $79.99, or even $139.99 for a downloadable PDF of their book. Of course, they claimed the book is worth much more (but I highly doubt that it is worth anywhere near the cover price). Anyway, selling your book in PDF format is a possibility. You can also sell your e-book on a variety of popular platforms such as Kindle, Nook, and iBooks.  Each of these requires special formatting, agreeing to their contract terms, and agreeing to their pricing structures. Going this route means your books are published through the channels of Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or Apple. They sell the books and keep a portion of it for themselves. The amount you get ends up being the “royalty” they pay to you. These channels pay royalties faster than traditional publishers, so you will see your money sooner. They also pay you a higher percentage of the cover price of your book than traditional publishers do. E-BOOK AGGREGATORS For authors who cannot or don’t want to learn all of the specific ins and outs of creating an e-book for publication, there are services called e-book aggregators. The two e-book aggregators that I have seen recommended most often are SmashWords.com and Draft2Digital.com.  SmashWords has a few more requirements than D2D, but those requirements force you to submit files that are well formatted and meet other quality requirements. Some people use these aggregators only for certain vendors.  Four instance, I know someone who publishes their books on Kindle themselves but uses Smash Words to publish through Apple iBooks.  Because Apple has a lot of hoops you have to jump through, they would rather let Smash Words take care of it for a fee. TRADITIONAL PUBLISHING One option (and the one that was most commonly used in the past), is to approach a big publisher with your manuscript. Since most big publishers do not accept unsolicited manuscripts, this method often requires first getting an agent. Getting an agent is not necessarily easy. But, there are times when agents actually advertise they are looking for authors. These adverts often appear in publications such as...

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